Editor’s note: Hartford Public Schools in Hartford, Connecticut was awarded a 2017 USDA Farm to School grant to incorporate higher volumes of local food into the school menu. The grant will allow the district to install new processing equipment to establish an enhanced "central production kitchen" in Hartford's Journalism & Media Academy. This kitchen will process, package, and distribute local foods to a network of eighteen schools while increasing the flavor and variety of school meals. Hartford schools will also expand the district's partnership with FoodCorps to increase nutrition promotion and food education in both the classroom and cafeteria. We wanted to learn more about this important project and the crucial support of farmers, FoodCorps, community partners, and the USDA that made it possible.
Immigrants to the United States often experience significant obstacles as they seek to create a life here. Financial, cultural, language, education, and a whole host of other concerns can overwhelm immigrant communities. This is why many immigrant groups have historically organized their communities to provide mutual aid and resources that ease the stress, suffering, and bewilderment which accompanies moving to another country and acclimating to a new culture. One such organization is the African Alliance of Rhode Island (AARI).

Community Agreements

Anytime people gather as a group we form both a community and a culture. At the NESAWG conference we seek a community and culture that is respectful, comfortable, open, curious, and kind. Community Agreements help us identify concrete ways to create that culture and to talk about and through conflict without creating a . Using these practices and tools we can challenge ourselves and each other while still recognizing we’re all coming from different places of knowing and transforming.

NESAWG staff and board strongly condemn our government’s inhumane and unjust actions against immigrants and call humane treatment for everyone seeking to enter this country whether they are escaping violence, pursuing a better life, or joining family members who already live here. We acknowledge that all people except those indigenous to this land are settlers (regardless of status as immigrants or enslaved peoples), and that the legacy of land theft and racism can be traced from colonization to our present crisis. READ MORE
Reportback from the NASDA Annual Meeting

Pages

Subscribe to NESAWG RSS